Friday Fiction – You Can Lead An Author To A Story…

For those who don’t know, Friday Fictioneers is a challenge to write a 100 word story from a picture prompt. It’s hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields, and anyone can play. Thanks for hosting, Rochelle! Check out the link at the end of my story to see what other fictioneers did with this week’s prompt.

Thanks for the photo, Doug. I hope I did it justice 🙂

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Copyright -Douglas M. MacIlroy

Copyright -Douglas M. MacIlroy

You Can Lead An Author To A Story…

The Author leaned on the fence, watching the Horse. Neither made a noise and the silence was pleasing.

Eventually, the Author spoke.

“Whatcha doin’, horsey?”

The Horse, of course, didn’t reply.

The Author, who was used to writing both sides of a dialogue, carried on without him.

“Jus’ watering my garden.”

“Whatcha doin’ that for, horsey?”

The Author continued in this vein for a while, but soon realised her story was going nowhere, so gave up and went on her way.

The Horse put down his hose and watched her go.

“Silly cow,” he said, and returned to his watering.

(100 words)

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Need more silliness? Try this for size: To The Bloke I Fall Over In Front Of (883 words)

Need more Friday Fiction? Click the blue frog to read more stories from other fictioneers!


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94 thoughts on “Friday Fiction – You Can Lead An Author To A Story…

    • Hi Claire
      I wish I could take all the credit for ‘silly cow’ but it was a last minute edit by my luvly hubby- actually, he suggested ‘stupid cow’ which I thought was a bit harsh. Anyway, he’s a very clever man because the line works perfectly. Just wish it was my idea 🙂

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  1. Oh sheer brilliance, sheer magic, in the tradition of theatre I so love, the theatre of the absurd whence sprung Godot, but is best practiced in literature in the Czech republic and Romania. Shockingly clever.

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    • Oh pirate, you have made my year with your wonderful comment. I was going to argue with you about the best theatre of the absurd being French, but checked and my favourite, Ionesco, is actually Romanian so you win! Thank you so much – to have my work called ‘shockingly clever’ is just about the best compliment ever.

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      • Ionescu’s (not sure of spelling) grandson actually blogs on wordpress! He writes poetry, somewhat very much in the vein of his grandfather, lives in Italy..just thought that would make an interesting addition!

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        • I checked – because I thought I might have made a mistake – but it was Ionescu then changed to Ionesco when he moved to France. Not sure why?
          I’d love to read some of his grandson’s stuff – what’s his site called?

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    • Hi janet
      Originally I had ‘What a strange lady’, but my hubby came along at the last minute and suggested ‘stupid cow’ which I changed to ‘silly cow’ – so I never intended the author to literally be a cow (although I LOVE that idea!).

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    • Thanks train-whistle. It was a great prompt this week, although the temptation to go with leading a horse to water was almost too much to bear! Glad I made you laugh 😀

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    • Are you saying horses are more intelligent than cows? I used to help milking the cows when I was younger, and they looked pretty savvy to me! Glad you found my little tale funny and thanks for commenting!

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    • Lol. That’s going to have to go in my book of terrible puns, jules! Yes, I agree completely though about the uniqueness of our stories – I never cease to be amazed. Roll on next week’s prompt!

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      • Perhaps being that my Hubby is an electrical engineer…one of my favorites is that P U is 2/3rds of a PUN.
        I’ve like this 100 word bit so much that I’ve written outside ‘the prompt box’. Well…just have been inspired by other prompts.
        Write on!

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  2. You know the horse has much more to this comment than just that she resembles a fellow farm critter. I am sure the horse did not like having words put in or spoken from his mouth.

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    • Thank you. Maybe if she’d treated him with a bit more respect (or waited until he’d got that hose out of his mouth so he could answer) she might have got a decent conversation out of it!

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  3. there you go again El…..making it look so easy. Great fun read. I laughed out loud also at the end. I always thought that is what my dog says after I ‘talk’ to him and then leave the room. 😉

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  4. Pingback: Friday Fictioneers 100-Word Story Challenge: The Greatest Gift | Poetic Mapping: Walking into Art

    • Thanks Beth – you’re the only one who’s commented on the title – glad you liked it – I struggled to think of something and then it came to me. Thanks for commenting 🙂

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    • Hi Doug
      I’m thrilled you liked my little tale. It was surprisingly difficult to come up with something – mainly because the phrase ‘you can take a horse to water…’ kept popping into my head, and I just knew that was too obvious! Mystic is a beautiful horse, and the photo is wonderful.

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  5. I’m sure you don’t need another comment saying how funny this is – but it is. Sadly, I recognise myself in this tale, though I talk to my dog, not a horse. I hope he doesn’t think I’m a silly cow!

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  6. This is so good. The line, ‘The Author, who was used to writing both sides of a dialogue, carried on without him.’ is so telling. I can hear her voice change for the horse’s lines and even see her change position as she says them. Wonderful and so funny.

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    • Thanks Sarah Ann – you picked out my favourite line! I knew I had something good when that came to mind 🙂 Thank you so much for your lovely comments!

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  7. Loved your take on the prompt, particularly your line ‘The Author who was used to writing both sides of a dialogue…’
    An inspirational piece of work, well done.
    Dee

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